Category Archives: economics

Digital collecting

In my last post, I wrote a little bit about my views on collection and the effect on content industries in the digital age. I argued that if people weren’t buying music anymore, it was probably because purchasing digital music does not satisfy the compulsion to collect. Some of this is unavoidable– collecting digital files will never be quite the same as collecting physical objects. However, I believe there are things that these digital content industries can do in order to court the purchases of collectors.
Continue reading

Why people don’t buy music

I’ve read a couple of different articles recently about how people aren’t buying music anymore. I don’t know if that’s ultimately true, but obviously the nature of media consumption has changed. Whenever I read an explanation of how are attitudes toward media have changed, I feel like people are missing some important points.
Continue reading

Shirky/Pink in WIRED

Ok, so apparently I’m not the only one to connect Clay Shirky’s recent talk about “cognitive surplus” with Dan Pink.  Wired had an article a while back where the two converse about motivation and collaboration.  It’s a pretty good read (though suffers a strange overly-polished tone), but it won’t hold any revelations if you’ve watched their TED talks.
Continue reading

Work/Reward

Clay Shirky has made yet another interesting and hopeful TED talk.  I’m not going to rehash the things he talks about, but instead jump straight to the niggling half-formed question that I can’t quite shake: what happens if the most beneficial and important things we will do are not things we’re financially compensated for?
Continue reading