Unfair iPad complaints

I’ve been thinking a lot about the iPad and considering whether to buy one myself. In reading some of the reviews and responses, I’ve encountered a set of complaints, many of which I don’t think are entirely fair, and I wanted to share my thoughts.
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Fragmentation III

Ok, I didn’t mean to talk so much about data fragmentation in the Internet age, but it has been an issue that has bothered me for a while and it doesn’t seem to be getting better. The third (and perhaps final) topic that I wanted to cover was document/media storage. The prior two articles were essentially about messaging, but now I want to talk about the places where you store your documents, your music, and your movies.
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Fragmentation II

To continue talking about fragmentation, I feel like there’s an inherent problem with online social networking. It’s all fine so long as you stick with a single site for social networking, but otherwise it gets messy. You like Facebook, all your friends are on Facebook, and you never leave Facebook? Then everything is peachy-keen.
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Fragmentation

It’s a minor complaint, but I’m a little put off by the fragmentation of information in the modern Internet age.

For example, I just signed up for a Facebook account after years of avoiding social networking sites. I was also excited to get a Google Wave account recently, and I like some of the things that I can do with that service. As good as these services are, the same thing struck me after using them for a short time: this does not ultimately lessen the complexity of my online life.
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Healthcare reform

To all the people who find themselves concerned with the health care reform proposals going on now, particularly those who are worried about socialized healthcare, I would like to explain why I don’t think you should be worried. I’m not going to try to debunk some of the hysterical claims about things like “death panels” because they’ve already been debunked in other places. Also, I’m not going to argue that creating a new socialized healthcare system will be better than our current capitalist free-market system. On the contrary, what I’d like to argue is that our current system is already a socialized system and not a free-market system, and therefore it’s nonsensical to worry about “socializing” it.
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Laziness

I’ve been pretty interested in the idea of laziness for most of my life, tracing back to the experience of having a teacher in middle school who regularly accused me of being lazy. It really made me wonder what it means to “be lazy”. Sure, I didn’t like working. But isn’t it the default state of human beings to be averse to work? You might think, “No, not me. I’m willing to work very hard.” Well yes, you may work very hard when hard work is required to attain something you desire, but that doesn’t mean you’re not averse to work.
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More comments on statistics

Since my last post, I’ve had a couple of other thoughts on the deceiving nature of statistics. In the era of such scientific achievements, people are understandably inclined to view scientific study and statistical analysis as the most proper means of determining truth. However, properly understood, statistics are merely a means of making a “best guess” based on limited information, and not a magical method for determining actual patterns. So let’s examine the coin toss…
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Impossible things happen every day

There’s this funny thing I like to point out to those who are too quick to dismiss things as impossible: According to statistics, the most statistically unlikely things are likely to happen. In fact, we assume the impossible will happen, we rely on it, and if statistically improbable events never occurred, we would live in a very strange world.
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